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Gallo Pinto-Stuffed Peppers with Fried Sweet Plantains

gallo pinto-stuffed peppers with fried sweet plantains Side
Gallo Pinto-Stuffed Peppers with Fried Sweet Plantains
  • Prep 25 min
  • Total 45 min
  • Ingredients 9
  • Servings 5

Morena Escardo The expression “comfort food” means one thing to me: beans. I grew up eating beans on an almost daily basis, either in a soup, or stir fried with rice in an exquisitely simple dish called gallo pinto. Peruvians eat a lot of beans, but these are usually creamy and cooked with pork or some other kind of meat. Fortunately, my mom is not Peruvian, so beans in my house were always strictly vegetarian, even before I became one. The topping of choice both for gallo pinto and for the bean soup was (and still is) cubed or sliced avocado, cheese, and sometimes tortillas or fried plantains. When I prepare stuffed peppers, I always try to do something different but simple; and that’s how this dish came to be. This is one of the easiest ways to give your leftover rice and beans a complete makeover! MORE + LESS -

Ingredients

2
tablespoons olive oil, + 3 teaspoons more
1
slice onion, chopped
2
cans Progresso™ dark red kidney beans, rinsed and drained
3
cups cooked, leftover rice
Salt, to taste
5
bell peppers
1 1/2
tablespoon butter
1
avocado
2
ripe plantains, sliced lengthwise

Directions

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  • 1
    Preheat the oven to 350ºF.
  • 2
    Heat 2 tablespoons olive oil over medium heat. Sauté the onion until golden brown.
  • 3
    Add the beans to the pan and fry them for a few minutes, without letting them dissolve.
  • 4
    Add the rice, season with salt, and sauté for a few more minutes.
  • 5
    Cut the bell peppers’ tops off. Remove the seeds and veins from the inside. Reserve the tops.
  • 6
    Rub every bell pepper both on the inside and the outside with 1 teaspoon olive oil.
  • 7
    Fill with gallo pinto, put the tops back on, and bake for 25 minutes, or until the pepper is soft but still holds its shape. Remove from the oven.
  • 8
    Melt the butter in a large skillet, and fry the plantain slices for a couple minutes on each side, or until golden brown. (This can be done in badges if they don’t fit in the skillet.)
  • 9
    Serve each pepper with some fried plantains and avocado slices on the side.

Expert Tips

  • If you have some leftover gallo pinto in the fridge, use that instead. You will save some time.
  • If you want to make a more nutritional version of this dish, skip the fried plantains and serve the bell peppers with a green salad.
  • You can also remove the top of the pepper and place the avocado slices on top of the gallo pinto instead.

Nutrition Information

No nutrition information available for this recipe

More About This Recipe

  • Morena Escardo The expression “comfort food” means one thing to me: beans. I grew up eating beans on an almost daily basis, either in a soup, or stir fried with rice in an exquisitely simple dish called gallo pinto. Peruvians eat a lot of beans, but these are usually creamy and cooked with pork or some other kind of meat. Fortunately, my mom is not Peruvian, so beans in my house were always strictly vegetarian, even before I became one. The topping of choice both for gallo pinto and for the bean soup was (and still is) cubed or sliced avocado, cheese, and sometimes tortillas or fried plantains. When I prepare stuffed peppers, I always try to do something different but simple; and that’s how this dish came to be. This is one of the easiest ways to give your leftover rice and beans a complete makeover!

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