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Guaguas de Pan

  • Prep 3 hr 15 min
  • Total 4 hr 0 min
  • Ingredients 13
  • Servings 15

Ingredients

1/4
oz of yeast
1/2
cup warm milk
1/2
cup sugar
2
teaspoons salt
4
cups all-purpose flour, plus extra if needed
1
teaspoon ground cinnamon
4
eggs
1
teaspoon vanilla extract
1
stick butter
2
egg whites
Raisins
Icing
Candy cake decorations

Nutrition Information

NUTRITION INFORMATION PER SERVING

Serving Size: 1 Serving
% Daily Value
% Daily Value*:
Exchanges:
Free
*Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet.
No nutrition information available for this recipe

Expert Tips

You can fill them with jelly before baking.

As many of you already know, I love to explore the culinary traditions of every region. It’s very interesting for me to learn the roots and origins or certain recipes that have become traditional over time and are internationally known. This is the case when it comes to guaguas de pan, figures of babies or dolls made of sweet bread that, according to pre-Columbian traditions, are meant to represent the dearly departed. In Ecuador, The Day of the Dead is celebrated on November 2nd. They say that at its inception, the natives would nail wooden dolls to the coffins of the dead and bring them plentiful offerings of food. I learned about these customs not only for The Day of the Dead, but also for any time I crave these tasty pastries. Sometimes I fill them with jelly, sometimes I don’t, but whatever the case may be they always come out fantastic! Another Ecuadorian Day of the Dead tradition is the colada morada that goes hand in hand with the guaguas. But, for me, the best part of preparing this dessert is that my daughters love to help decorate and give color to these traditional dolls.

Use your imagination to decorate!

Directions

  • 1 Mix the warm milk and yeast in a medium bowl until the yeast is diluted.
  • 2 Whisk 1 cup of flour with the yeast mixture until you are left with a creamy paste. Let stand at room temperature for 1 hour for the dough to rise.
  • 3 Using a food processor, combine the other three cups of flour, sugar, salt, cinnamon, vanilla, softened butter and eggs. Finally, add the flour mixture with yeast. You should get a dough that comes away easily from the container. If it’s still sticky, add a little more flour.
  • 4 Once out of the container, forms a large ball and wrap in plastic wrap. Let it stand two more hours, or until its size has doubled.
  • 5 Just after 2 hours, push the dough down with your knuckles on a flat, floured surface, repeating this process several times.
  • 6 With the help of a pastry roller, work and flatten the dough to make a one-inch thick layer. Use cookie cutters in the shape of elongated dolls, or simply give the shape with your hands.
  • 7 Place the dolls on a baking sheet with waxed paper (or cooking spray). Let stand for 15 to 20 minutes until doubled in size.
  • 8 Preheat oven to 350°. With the aid of a brush, use the egg whites and cover the guaguas.
  • 9 Decorate your guaguas by adding raisins or more dough on the dolls after the egg spread so they stick better.
  • 10 Bake for 20 to 30 minutes, until browned.
  • 11 Let stand and cool completely, then decorate with icing or candy. Served with a rich Colada Morada.

As many of you already know, I love to explore the culinary traditions of every region. It’s very interesting for me to learn the roots and origins or certain recipes that have become traditional over time and are internationally known. This is the case when it comes to guaguas de pan, figures of babies or dolls made of sweet bread that, according to pre-Columbian traditions, are meant to represent the dearly departed. In Ecuador, The Day of the Dead is celebrated on November 2nd. They say that at its inception, the natives would nail wooden dolls to the coffins of the dead and bring them plentiful offerings of food. I learned about these customs not only for The Day of the Dead, but also for any time I crave these tasty pastries. Sometimes I fill them with jelly, sometimes I don’t, but whatever the case may be they always come out fantastic! Another Ecuadorian Day of the Dead tradition is the colada morada that goes hand in hand with the guaguas. But, for me, the best part of preparing this dessert is that my daughters love to help decorate and give color to these traditional dolls.

Rate and Comment

Martha Salas Martha Salas
September 28, 2015

As many of you already know, I love to explore the culinary traditions of every region. It’s very interesting for me to learn the roots and origins or certain recipes that have become traditional over time and are internationally known. This is the case when it comes to guaguas de pan, figures of babies or dolls made of sweet bread that, according to pre-Columbian traditions, are meant to represent the dearly departed. In Ecuador, The Day of the Dead is celebrated on November 2nd. They say that at its inception, the natives would nail wooden dolls to the coffins of the dead and bring them plentiful offerings of food. I learned about these customs not only for The Day of the Dead, but also for any time I crave these tasty pastries. Sometimes I fill them with jelly, sometimes I don’t, but whatever the case may be they always come out fantastic! Another Ecuadorian Day of the Dead tradition is the colada morada that goes hand in hand with the guaguas. But, for me, the best part of preparing this dessert is that my daughters love to help decorate and give color to these traditional dolls.