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Yucca Stuffed with Chorizo and Yellow Ají Mayonnaise

  • Prep 15 min
  • Total 1 hr 30 min
  • Ingredients 11
  • Servings 6

Ingredients

1
lb. of yucca
Salt to taste
4
cloves of garlic, peeled
1
egg yolk
Pepper to taste
1
cup of chorizo, peeled
1
tablespoon of parsley, chopped
1
egg, lightly whipped
1
cup of flour
1/2
cup of vegetable oil
1
cup of mayonnaise with 2 tablespoons of yellow ají paste

Nutrition Information

NUTRITION INFORMATION PER SERVING

Serving Size: 1 Serving
% Daily Value
% Daily Value*:
Exchanges:
Free
*Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet.
No nutrition information available for this recipe

Expert Tips

I’ve used Huacho sausages – very popular in Peru – to stuff the yucca balls, but any chorizo or sausage (well seasoned) goes great with this recipe. Mexican chorizo is very good, especially the spicy ones.

In Latin countries, yucca or cassava is very popular and has a variety of uses. It’s no wonder that this ingredient is such a large part of the traditional diets in many regions. It can be consumed boiled, fried, as part of a soup or stew, as bread, as a beverage and even in desserts. Many other recipes can be made from its starch, turning it into a staple in our kitchens while also being nutritious and delicious. In Peru there are two types of yucca: white and yellow. The yellow is used in many recipes because it’s creamy and cooks quickly. It also gives dishes an appetizing color, especially when served as a side. For example, in Northern Peru dishes like causa and ceviche are served with a side of yucca. The seco de cabrito and seco de pescado are served with a portion of tender yucca because its texture is perfect and its neutral taste allows you to enjoy the flavors of the whole dish. It’s low cost is another reason yucca is very popular. If you do plan on preparing a lot of yucca recipes, just make sure it’s well cooked. Yucca contains a substance that can be toxic if consumed raw. I leave you with a recipe for a traditional Sunday brunch. Delicious balls of stuffed yucca served with yellow ají mayonnaise or avocado mayonnaise. They’re delicious and everyone loves them. If you want to give your recipe some variety, you can use cheese or any other meat in place of the chorizo. Make as many changes as you like and enjoy the satisfied faces of your family!

Use white or yellow yucca (yellow is creamier).

Fried yucca has to be eaten quickly because they’re not as good when they are reheated.

I love covering them in panko instead of flour to fry them. This way they come out crunchier and panko creates an irresistible crust.

You can also serve them with a mayonnaise mixed with avocado.

Directions

  • 1 Peel the yucca and place it in a pot with enough water to cover it, salt and peeled garlic. Cook over medium heat until the yucca is tender (use a knife to check). Turn off the stove and let the yucca cool in the water.
  • 2 Mash the yucca with the help of a potato masher or a fork until it attains a tender and soft dough-like consistency. Also mash the garlic. Add the egg yolk, salt and pepper to taste, and knead for a couple of minutes and set aside.
  • 3 In the meantime, fry the chorizo without oil in a saucepan over medium heat. It will cook in its own oil as it heats up. Taste for salt and when it’s ready, add the chopped parsley. Let cool at room temperature.
  • 4 To form the balls, use portions of the dough the size of a walnut. Form small tortillas and put a teaspoon of chorizo in the middle. Use your hands to close the tortilla and form a ball.
  • 5 Dip them in the whipped egg and then in the flour. Brush off the excess and fry the little yucca balls. Pour the vegetable oil into a saucepan and heat over medium heat. Add the balls and fry until they are golden brown, turning them to make sure they are even.
  • 6 Transfer on to a plate or a rack covered in paper towels.
  • 7 Serve on pretty dishes with a side of yellow ají mayonnaise.

In Latin countries, yucca or cassava is very popular and has a variety of uses. It’s no wonder that this ingredient is such a large part of the traditional diets in many regions. It can be consumed boiled, fried, as part of a soup or stew, as bread, as a beverage and even in desserts. Many other recipes can be made from its starch, turning it into a staple in our kitchens while also being nutritious and delicious. In Peru there are two types of yucca: white and yellow. The yellow is used in many recipes because it’s creamy and cooks quickly. It also gives dishes an appetizing color, especially when served as a side. For example, in Northern Peru dishes like causa and ceviche are served with a side of yucca. The seco de cabrito and seco de pescado are served with a portion of tender yucca because its texture is perfect and its neutral taste allows you to enjoy the flavors of the whole dish. It’s low cost is another reason yucca is very popular. If you do plan on preparing a lot of yucca recipes, just make sure it’s well cooked. Yucca contains a substance that can be toxic if consumed raw. I leave you with a recipe for a traditional Sunday brunch. Delicious balls of stuffed yucca served with yellow ají mayonnaise or avocado mayonnaise. They’re delicious and everyone loves them. If you want to give your recipe some variety, you can use cheese or any other meat in place of the chorizo. Make as many changes as you like and enjoy the satisfied faces of your family!

Rate and Comment

Morena Cuadra Morena Cuadra
September 14, 2015

In Latin countries, yucca or cassava is very popular and has a variety of uses. It’s no wonder that this ingredient is such a large part of the traditional diets in many regions. It can be consumed boiled, fried, as part of a soup or stew, as bread, as a beverage and even in desserts. Many other recipes can be made from its starch, turning it into a staple in our kitchens while also being nutritious and delicious. In Peru there are two types of yucca: white and yellow. The yellow is used in many recipes because it’s creamy and cooks quickly. It also gives dishes an appetizing color, especially when served as a side. For example, in Northern Peru dishes like causa and ceviche are served with a side of yucca. The seco de cabrito and seco de pescado are served with a portion of tender yucca because its texture is perfect and its neutral taste allows you to enjoy the flavors of the whole dish. It’s low cost is another reason yucca is very popular. If you do plan on preparing a lot of yucca recipes, just make sure it’s well cooked. Yucca contains a substance that can be toxic if consumed raw. I leave you with a recipe for a traditional Sunday brunch. Delicious balls of stuffed yucca served with yellow ají mayonnaise or avocado mayonnaise. They’re delicious and everyone loves them. If you want to give your recipe some variety, you can use cheese or any other meat in place of the chorizo. Make as many changes as you like and enjoy the satisfied faces of your family!