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Chicken Mole Tacos

  • Prep 10 min
  • Total 40 min
  • Ingredients 7
  • Servings 8

Ingredients

3
chicken breasts
1
jar of mole
1/8
cup raisins
2
tablespoons peanut butter
16
corn tortillas
1/4
cup queso fresco
Sesame seeds, to garnish

Nutrition Information

NUTRITION INFORMATION PER SERVING

Serving Size: 1 Serving
% Daily Value
% Daily Value*:
Exchanges:
Free
*Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet.
No nutrition information available for this recipe

Expert Tips

Any left over mole can be eaten with chips or added on top of your taco.

I was lucky enough to go to a mole demonstration a year or so back to taste authentic mole recipes from the central and southern regions of Mexico. Specifically, from Puebla, Oaxaca, and San Pedro Atocpan; the three most common places where mole is known to come from. There were all sorts to choose from including black, red, yellow, Colorado (another name for red), green, almendrado, and pipián. You could tell that a lot of love went into the making of these! I can't even express how much I adore watching people put that much intricate patience into their craft of cooking. Even the way they talked about their dish, it was as if they were talking about the meaning of life. In some ways I feel like it is. Of course I was inspired to come home and make my personal favorite: black mole. Unfortunately I usually don't have the time to make mole from scratch, so I use mole out of a jar, which gives you (almost!) the same effect. At the very least it's an easy solution to get mole on the table quickly and it's super appetizing. I put in a corn tortilla as tacos and top them off with queso fresco and sesame seeds. Again, for people on the go, it's a speedy way to feed your loved ones a beautiful, traditional Mexican dish.

Directions

  • 1 Boil chicken for 20 minutes.
  • 2 Remove from water (reserve water to help prepare the mole), and shred it using two forks.
  • 3 Add jarred mole to a blender, with raisins, peanut butter, and the water from the boiled chicken. Blend until smooth. (Use the amount of water instructed on the jar: usually a 4 to 1 ratio).
  • 4 Pour 2 cups mole into large saucepan and mix with shredded chicken. Cook for 10 minutes.
  • 5 Heat tortillas over an open flame.
  • 6 Fill center with chicken mole mixture.
  • 7 Top with queso fresco and sesame seeds.
  • 8 Serve and enjoy!

I was lucky enough to go to a mole demonstration a year or so back to taste authentic mole recipes from the central and southern regions of Mexico. Specifically, from Puebla, Oaxaca, and San Pedro Atocpan; the three most common places where mole is known to come from. There were all sorts to choose from including black, red, yellow, Colorado (another name for red), green, almendrado, and pipián. You could tell that a lot of love went into the making of these! I can't even express how much I adore watching people put that much intricate patience into their craft of cooking. Even the way they talked about their dish, it was as if they were talking about the meaning of life. In some ways I feel like it is. Of course I was inspired to come home and make my personal favorite: black mole. Unfortunately I usually don't have the time to make mole from scratch, so I use mole out of a jar, which gives you (almost!) the same effect. At the very least it's an easy solution to get mole on the table quickly and it's super appetizing. I put in a corn tortilla as tacos and top them off with queso fresco and sesame seeds. Again, for people on the go, it's a speedy way to feed your loved ones a beautiful, traditional Mexican dish.

Rate and Comment

Nicole Presley Nicole Presley
September 21, 2015

I was lucky enough to go to a mole demonstration a year or so back to taste authentic mole recipes from the central and southern regions of Mexico. Specifically, from Puebla, Oaxaca, and San Pedro Atocpan; the three most common places where mole is known to come from. There were all sorts to choose from including black, red, yellow, Colorado (another name for red), green, almendrado, and pipián. You could tell that a lot of love went into the making of these! I can't even express how much I adore watching people put that much intricate patience into their craft of cooking. Even the way they talked about their dish, it was as if they were talking about the meaning of life. In some ways I feel like it is. Of course I was inspired to come home and make my personal favorite: black mole. Unfortunately I usually don't have the time to make mole from scratch, so I use mole out of a jar, which gives you (almost!) the same effect. At the very least it's an easy solution to get mole on the table quickly and it's super appetizing. I put in a corn tortilla as tacos and top them off with queso fresco and sesame seeds. Again, for people on the go, it's a speedy way to feed your loved ones a beautiful, traditional Mexican dish.