We support you, just not your browser.

Your browser hasn’t been updated in a while. For a better experience, we recommend upgrading to the latest version of IE, Google Chrome, Firefox, or Safari.

Ver en Español
  • Facebook
    3
  • Pinterest
    11
  • Save
    2
  • WhatsApp
  • Print
    10

Vigorón

  • Prep 25 min
  • Total 45 min
  • Ingredients 11
  • Servings 3

Ingredients

1
lb yucca or cassava, peeled
2
garlic cloves
Salt
1/2
cabbage
1
tomato, diced
1/4
onion, finely diced
1/2
cup pineapple vinegar
1
tablespoon oil
8
ozs crunchy pork chicharrón or pork rinds, cut into pieces
1
tablespoon habanero chile (known as congo chile in Nicaragua), optional
Banana leaves

Nutrition Information

NUTRITION INFORMATION PER SERVING

Serving Size: 1 Serving
% Daily Value
% Daily Value*:
Exchanges:
Free
*Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet.
No nutrition information available for this recipe

Expert Tips

Habanero or ‘congo’ chile as it's known locally in Nicaragua, are very common in local cuisine. Initially green in color and very small, these chiles turn red and juicy when mature. But beware, this pepper is very spicy!

In the streets of Managua, just like in other Nicaraguan cities-especially in Granada-it's common to see street vendors with large baskets, full of ingredients ready for making the traditional vigorón. This name might seem funny, and really doesn't have much to do with the ingredients, but it's practically an institution in this Central American country. This typical dish is prepared with cooked yuca combined with crispy pork chicharrón and served with the classic Nicaraguan salad: cabbage, tomato and a little onion. This same salad is used for accompanying tajadas (fried plantain chips), carne asada, tortillas and many other local specialties. Vigorón is usually served mid-morning, accompanied by fresco de cacao (a chilled home-made hot chocolate), tiste or pinolillo, two similar versions of a drink made with ground corn and cocoa. If you purchase vigorón on the street, you'll usually see it served over a banana leaf or sometimes over a disposable plate and bagged to take home. This dish is the quintessential plato casero or home-made meal that is also popular for special occasions; it's a national favorite, easy to prepare and always rico. The city of Granada and vigorón have a special connection as well. Frequently, Nicaraguans will travel to this delightful colonial city just to have a plate of vigorón under the pergola of the Central Park. The atmosphere is simply beautiful; in the shadow of the Mombacho volcano and at the edge of the largest lake in the country, between the small streets where horse-drawn carriages can still be seen, you can find the most famous dishes of vigorón.

Directions

  • 1 Peel the yucca and cut in to pieces. Place in a pot with the garlic and fill with enough water to cover the ingredients.
  • 2 Bring the mixture to a boil and then lower to medium heat. Cook with the lid half covering the pot until the yucca is soft when tested with a knife. Add some salt and cook for five more minutes. Remove from heat and let cool.
  • 3 Meanwhile, prepare the salad by finely slicing the cabbage and place in a bowl. Combine with the diced tomato and onion. Season with the salt, vinegar and oil, then set aside.
  • 4 To serve, place a banana leaf over each plate and add a few pieces of yuca and chicharrón on top. Then cover with the cabbage salad. Add a few habanero chiles if you feel adventurous and serve immediately.

In the streets of Managua, just like in other Nicaraguan cities-especially in Granada-it's common to see street vendors with large baskets, full of ingredients ready for making the traditional vigorón. This name might seem funny, and really doesn't have much to do with the ingredients, but it's practically an institution in this Central American country. This typical dish is prepared with cooked yuca combined with crispy pork chicharrón and served with the classic Nicaraguan salad: cabbage, tomato and a little onion. This same salad is used for accompanying tajadas (fried plantain chips), carne asada, tortillas and many other local specialties. Vigorón is usually served mid-morning, accompanied by fresco de cacao (a chilled home-made hot chocolate), tiste or pinolillo, two similar versions of a drink made with ground corn and cocoa. If you purchase vigorón on the street, you'll usually see it served over a banana leaf or sometimes over a disposable plate and bagged to take home. This dish is the quintessential plato casero or home-made meal that is also popular for special occasions; it's a national favorite, easy to prepare and always rico. The city of Granada and vigorón have a special connection as well. Frequently, Nicaraguans will travel to this delightful colonial city just to have a plate of vigorón under the pergola of the Central Park. The atmosphere is simply beautiful; in the shadow of the Mombacho volcano and at the edge of the largest lake in the country, between the small streets where horse-drawn carriages can still be seen, you can find the most famous dishes of vigorón.

Rate and Comment

Morena Cuadra Morena Cuadra
September 23, 2015

In the streets of Managua, just like in other Nicaraguan cities-especially in Granada-it's common to see street vendors with large baskets, full of ingredients ready for making the traditional vigorón. This name might seem funny, and really doesn't have much to do with the ingredients, but it's practically an institution in this Central American country. This typical dish is prepared with cooked yuca combined with crispy pork chicharrón and served with the classic Nicaraguan salad: cabbage, tomato and a little onion. This same salad is used for accompanying tajadas (fried plantain chips), carne asada, tortillas and many other local specialties. Vigorón is usually served mid-morning, accompanied by fresco de cacao (a chilled home-made hot chocolate), tiste or pinolillo, two similar versions of a drink made with ground corn and cocoa. If you purchase vigorón on the street, you'll usually see it served over a banana leaf or sometimes over a disposable plate and bagged to take home. This dish is the quintessential plato casero or home-made meal that is also popular for special occasions; it's a national favorite, easy to prepare and always rico. The city of Granada and vigorón have a special connection as well. Frequently, Nicaraguans will travel to this delightful colonial city just to have a plate of vigorón under the pergola of the Central Park. The atmosphere is simply beautiful; in the shadow of the Mombacho volcano and at the edge of the largest lake in the country, between the small streets where horse-drawn carriages can still be seen, you can find the most famous dishes of vigorón.