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Roast Leg of Lamb Segovia Style

  • Prep 20 min
  • Total 2 hr 30 min
  • Ingredients 12
  • Servings 6

Ingredients

For the Roast Lamb

3
to 4 lbs leg of lamb
4
tablespoons of lard
5
garlic cloves (medium to large), coarsely chopped
2
tablespoons fresh thyme, finely chopped
2
tablespoons kosher salt
1/2
cup sherry wine (aromatic)
1
cup water

For Roast Potatoes

3
lbs small red potatoes
1
tablespoon lard
1
tablespoon kosher salt
2
tablespoons fresh thyme, torn into small sprigs
2
garlic cloves (medium to large)

Nutrition Information

NUTRITION INFORMATION PER SERVING

Serving Size: 1 Serving
% Daily Value
% Daily Value*:
Exchanges:
Free
*Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet.
No nutrition information available for this recipe

Expert Tips

The lamb will taste better if using lard, but for a lighter version feel free to use the olive oil. It’s OK. I will forgive you.

Roast lamb! I think I have the juice of roast lamb running in my veins. Roast lamb is one of the most traditional dishes from the region of Castilla, the center of Spain. It is arid and rocky and mountainous, and tomillo (thyme) grows wild in its hills. My shepherding ancestors ate roast lamb, as did my great great-grandparents, great-grandparents, grandparents… well you get the picture. It is an ancient and treasured dish, and it is eaten with enthusiasm and respect. In Segovia it is practically an art form. I would argue that the best meal I have ever eaten was at Mesón de Candido, where the roast lamb is so soft and well done that it does not require a knife to cut. My mouth is watering just thinking about it. I still remember dipping the bread into the oily juices at the bottom of the pot. One note on Spanish roast lamb – it is cooked well done. Today the trend is lamb cooked to a pink doneness, but traditional Spanish lamb is well done. That is how I am going to show you to make it. I hope you like it as much as I do. I guarantee that when you make it, your home will smell like “gloria bendita” or heaven.

Feel free to pour some extra sherry on the lamb about 20 minutes before you remove from oven. It just makes it much more delicious.

Potatoes are even better if you use the tiny roasting kind. You will not have to chop new potatoes as you can place them whole around the leg of lamb.

The typical salad to serve with roast lamb should consist of bitter greens, like chicory or frisée.

Have a nice full bodied bottle of red wine to drink with the lamb. Try a good Spanish wine!

You must, must, must eat this with a loaf of crusty bread, so that you can dip it in the sauce in the pan. If you do not, generations of Spaniards will roll over in their graves because the ¨moje¨ is the best part!

If you do have a clay pot to cook the lamb in, use it to serve the lamb right on the table. It´s a beautiful thing!

Directions

  • 1 Preheat the oven to 350°F
  • 2 While the oven is heating, clean and wash the potatoes, and let them dry.
  • 3 Preparing the Lamb Rub the lard over the lamb, and then rub on the chopped garlic, thyme and salt. Make sure to rub evenly so that the whole leg is covered. Place the leg into a nice sturdy roasting pan.
  • 4 Preparing the Potatoes Chop the potatoes into three or four pieces, about 2 square inches each. Place in the roasting pan around the lamb. Distribute pieces of lard around them, and then sprinkle salt, thyme and garlic over. Pour sherry wine over the lamb. It will seep into potatoes as everything cooks. Pour the cup of water over to one side of the pan, so that you do not rinse the condiments off the lamb or potatoes.
  • 5 Roasting the Lamb and Potatoes Place the roasting pan with the lamb and potatoes into the pre-heated oven, uncovered and cook for 1 hour 40 minutes approximately. Calculate about 25 minutes of cooking per pound for a well done lamb, the way it is traditionally served in Spain.
  • 6 Check on lamb and potatoes every half hour or so making sure they are not burning. Baste everything with the liquid from pan. If potatoes start to look like they are in danger of overcooking or drying, remove them as you go along. If anything looks like it might burn, feel free to cover it with some foil.
  • 7 Let the lamb rest about 20 minutes before you serve it.

Roast lamb! I think I have the juice of roast lamb running in my veins. Roast lamb is one of the most traditional dishes from the region of Castilla, the center of Spain. It is arid and rocky and mountainous, and tomillo (thyme) grows wild in its hills. My shepherding ancestors ate roast lamb, as did my great great-grandparents, great-grandparents, grandparents… well you get the picture. It is an ancient and treasured dish, and it is eaten with enthusiasm and respect. In Segovia it is practically an art form. I would argue that the best meal I have ever eaten was at Mesón de Candido, where the roast lamb is so soft and well done that it does not require a knife to cut. My mouth is watering just thinking about it. I still remember dipping the bread into the oily juices at the bottom of the pot. One note on Spanish roast lamb – it is cooked well done. Today the trend is lamb cooked to a pink doneness, but traditional Spanish lamb is well done. That is how I am going to show you to make it. I hope you like it as much as I do. I guarantee that when you make it, your home will smell like “gloria bendita” or heaven.

Rate and Comment

María Amelia Bazdekis María Amelia Bazdekis
September 11, 2015

Roast lamb! I think I have the juice of roast lamb running in my veins. Roast lamb is one of the most traditional dishes from the region of Castilla, the center of Spain. It is arid and rocky and mountainous, and tomillo (thyme) grows wild in its hills. My shepherding ancestors ate roast lamb, as did my great great-grandparents, great-grandparents, grandparents… well you get the picture. It is an ancient and treasured dish, and it is eaten with enthusiasm and respect. In Segovia it is practically an art form. I would argue that the best meal I have ever eaten was at Mesón de Candido, where the roast lamb is so soft and well done that it does not require a knife to cut. My mouth is watering just thinking about it. I still remember dipping the bread into the oily juices at the bottom of the pot. One note on Spanish roast lamb – it is cooked well done. Today the trend is lamb cooked to a pink doneness, but traditional Spanish lamb is well done. That is how I am going to show you to make it. I hope you like it as much as I do. I guarantee that when you make it, your home will smell like “gloria bendita” or heaven.