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Pan Dulce Trifle

  • Prep 10 min
  • Total 15 min
  • Ingredients 9
  • Servings 10

Ingredients

3
conchas, mexican sweet bread (each cut into 12 small pieces)
3
niño envuelto, Mexican sweet bread (each cut into 8 triangle pieces)
2
cups dulce de leche
5
cups whipped cream or custard (pudding)
1
cup fresh raspberries
1
cup fresh blueberries
2
cups fresh strawberries (cut into quarters pieces)
1
cup of white chocolate chips
1
teaspoon of candy sprinkles

Nutrition Information

NUTRITION INFORMATION PER SERVING

Serving Size: 1 Serving
% Daily Value
% Daily Value*:
Exchanges:
Free
*Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet.
No nutrition information available for this recipe

Expert Tips

Makes a beautiful centerpiece for your table during a feast.

I have always loved Trifles. The first time I had one, I was six years old and on a family vacation in England. My oldest cousin (who was traveling with us) had a pen pal in England that he had been writing to as a class project. When his pen pal's family found out our family was going to be visiting The United Kingdom, they kindly opened their doors to my family and invited all of us over for dinner. They made a huge English feast of soup and kidney pie. Then as a grand finale, they brought out a trifle for dessert. I remember marveling at the beautiful layer of sponge cake, fruit, and cream. I had never seen anything like it. I dug my spoon deep in the bowl and pulled out a delicious serving. This dessert made such an impact on me at such a tender age, when I took up dessert making of my own around the age of 13, trifle was one of the first I made. I used pan dulce (Mexican sweet bread) in place of sponge cake, which is typically used. The Mexican infused trifle was a complete hit with my family. It reminded us of our trip to England, and incorporated our own culture into a very English dessert. For the layers of pan dulce, I use a combination of conchas (the most common sweet bread with a seashell like pattern cut into the top) and niño envuelto (Literally means "wrapped up baby," which looks like a jelly roll and has a pink outer layer then covered in coconut). Enjoy this easy to make dessert and let your family marvel at all the beautiful layers. They will enjoy the taste as much as they will love looking at it.

Directions

  • 1 In bowl mix all berries together. Set aside.
  • 2 Cut all pan dulce (sweet bread).
  • 3 In medium sized Trifle bowl layer the conchas at bottom.
  • 4 Pour 1 cup dulce de leche over conchas.
  • 5 Next scoop 2 cups of whipped cream or custard over the conchas layer and smooth to form a flat layer.
  • 6 Top whipped cream or custard with 2 cups of mixed berries.
  • 7 Top with 1/2 cup of white chocolate chips.
  • 8 Layer the niño envuelto bread on top of the berries.
  • 9 Pour the last cup of dulce de leche over the niño envuelto pieces.
  • 10 Add another 2 cups whipped cream or custard on top of niño envuelto layer.
  • 11 Then top entire Trifle with remaining berries and white chocolate chips.
  • 12 Scoop the last cup of whipped cream on top, and sprinkle with candy sprinkles.

I have always loved Trifles. The first time I had one, I was six years old and on a family vacation in England. My oldest cousin (who was traveling with us) had a pen pal in England that he had been writing to as a class project. When his pen pal's family found out our family was going to be visiting The United Kingdom, they kindly opened their doors to my family and invited all of us over for dinner. They made a huge English feast of soup and kidney pie. Then as a grand finale, they brought out a trifle for dessert. I remember marveling at the beautiful layer of sponge cake, fruit, and cream. I had never seen anything like it. I dug my spoon deep in the bowl and pulled out a delicious serving. This dessert made such an impact on me at such a tender age, when I took up dessert making of my own around the age of 13, trifle was one of the first I made. I used pan dulce (Mexican sweet bread) in place of sponge cake, which is typically used. The Mexican infused trifle was a complete hit with my family. It reminded us of our trip to England, and incorporated our own culture into a very English dessert. For the layers of pan dulce, I use a combination of conchas (the most common sweet bread with a seashell like pattern cut into the top) and niño envuelto (Literally means "wrapped up baby," which looks like a jelly roll and has a pink outer layer then covered in coconut). Enjoy this easy to make dessert and let your family marvel at all the beautiful layers. They will enjoy the taste as much as they will love looking at it.

Rate and Comment

I have always loved Trifles. The first time I had one, I was six years old and on a family vacation in England. My oldest cousin (who was traveling with us) had a pen pal in England that he had been writing to as a class project. When his pen pal's family found out our family was going to be visiting The United Kingdom, they kindly opened their doors to my family and invited all of us over for dinner. They made a huge English feast of soup and kidney pie. Then as a grand finale, they brought out a trifle for dessert. I remember marveling at the beautiful layer of sponge cake, fruit, and cream. I had never seen anything like it. I dug my spoon deep in the bowl and pulled out a delicious serving. This dessert made such an impact on me at such a tender age, when I took up dessert making of my own around the age of 13, trifle was one of the first I made. I used pan dulce (Mexican sweet bread) in place of sponge cake, which is typically used. The Mexican infused trifle was a complete hit with my family. It reminded us of our trip to England, and incorporated our own culture into a very English dessert. For the layers of pan dulce, I use a combination of conchas (the most common sweet bread with a seashell like pattern cut into the top) and niño envuelto (Literally means "wrapped up baby," which looks like a jelly roll and has a pink outer layer then covered in coconut). Enjoy this easy to make dessert and let your family marvel at all the beautiful layers. They will enjoy the taste as much as they will love looking at it.