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Pan de los Muertos

  • Prep 40 min
  • Total 4 hr 50 min
  • Ingredients 17
  • Servings 12

Ingredients

2 1/2
cups all-purpose flour, more for dusting
1
cup whole wheat flour
1 1/2
teaspoons active dry yeast
1/2
teaspoon salt
2
teaspoons anise seeds
2
teaspoons cinnamon
1/3
cup light brown sugar
2
tablespoons granulated sugar
1/2
cup milk
1/2
cup butter
1/4
cup water at room temperature, plus 1 tablespoon reserved
2
large eggs, plus 1 separated (3 all together)
Zest of 1 large orange
1
tablespoon green sugar crystals
1
tablespoon orange sugar crystals
1
tablespoon red sugar crystals
1
tablespoon blue sugar crystals

Nutrition Information

NUTRITION INFORMATION PER SERVING

Serving Size: 1 Serving
Calories
271.5
% Daily Value
Total Fat
9.8g
15%
Saturated Fat
5.5g
28%
Cholesterol
67.9mg
23%
Sodium
122.6mg
5%
Potassium
142.0mg
4%
Total Carbohydrate
40.4g
14%
Dietary Fiber
2.6g
10%
Sugars
12.3g
Protein
6.4g
% Daily Value*:
Vitamin C
13.70%
14%
Calcium
4.50%
4%
Iron
11.20%
11%
Exchanges:
*Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet.

Expert Tips

When preparing breads that require time for them to rise, I like to heat my oven to 200ºF. I place my covered dough on stove top to let it rise in a timely manner.

Pan de muerto is typically prepared in Mexico the days before Día de los Muertos, a celebration that takes place on Nov. 1st and 2nd. It is lightly sweetened bread that is eaten along with many of the favorite foods of the loved ones that have passed away. The shape and designs on the bread symbolize the circle of life and the bones of the ones that have passed.

Directions

  • 1 Sift the two flours together.
  • 2 Combine 1 cup of flour mixture, 1 1/2 teaspoons yeast, 1/2 teaspoon of salt, 2 teaspoons anise seeds, 2 teaspoons cinnamon, 1/3 cup light brown sugar and 2 tablespoons sugar.
  • 3 In a small pan, combine the milk and butter. Cook just until the butter melts, add in the 1/4 cup of water and stir. With a thermometer, check that you achieve a temperature of 110ºF.
  • 4 Beat the milk mixture into the flour mixture until smooth. Beat in the 2 eggs, orange zest and 1 more cup of flour mixture. Gradually add in the rest of the flour until dough forms.
  • 5 Knead the dough on a lightly floured surface until smooth and flexible. Transfer the dough to a large greased bowl. Cover with plastic wrap and let dough rise in warm place for 2 hours.
  • 6 Punch dough down and using a pastry cutter, divide the dough into three equal pieces. Make two equal round loaves and transfer to baking sheet lined with parchment paper.
  • 7 Take the last piece of dough and cut in into 4 equal parts. On a lightly floured surface, using your hands, roll each piece into a cigar shape, about 7 inches long. As you roll it, press down, making indentations into the dough. The idea is to make them look like bones. Take two sections and make a criss-cross design on top of each loaf. Where the dough meets, the center of loaf, build up the dough in the shape of a knob. Cover loosely with plastic wrap and let rise for another hour.
  • 8 Preheat oven to 350ºF.
  • 9 Whisk together the reserved egg and 1 tablespoon of water. Brush the loaves with egg wash and sprinkle with different colored sugar crystals. Bake for 30 to 40 minutes. Remove from oven and let stand for 10 minutes before serving.

Pan de muerto is typically prepared in Mexico the days before Día de los Muertos, a celebration that takes place on Nov. 1st and 2nd. It is lightly sweetened bread that is eaten along with many of the favorite foods of the loved ones that have passed away. The shape and designs on the bread symbolize the circle of life and the bones of the ones that have passed.

Rate and Comment

Sonia Mendez Garcia Sonia Mendez Garcia
October 14, 2016

Pan de muerto is typically prepared in Mexico the days before Día de los Muertos, a celebration that takes place on Nov. 1st and 2nd. It is lightly sweetened bread that is eaten along with many of the favorite foods of the loved ones that have passed away. The shape and designs on the bread symbolize the circle of life and the bones of the ones that have passed.