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Mushroom and Pepper Risotto

  • Prep 20 min
  • Total 45 min
  • Ingredients 15
  • Servings 2

Ingredients

3
tablespoons vegetable oil
1/2
cup white onion, cubed
1/2
cup of leek, diced
1
cup red pepper (bell pepper), diced
1
cup Arborio rice
Salt and pepper
1 1/2
cup white wine
6
cups vegetable broth
Pinch of saffron
1
tablespoon butter
1
clove garlic, minced
1
lb mushrooms, clean
2
tablespoons chopped parsley
Micromix lettuce (or baby arugula)
Grated Parmesan cheese

Nutrition Information

NUTRITION INFORMATION PER SERVING

Serving Size: 1 Serving
% Daily Value
% Daily Value*:
Exchanges:
Free
*Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet.
No nutrition information available for this recipe

Expert Tips

If you can't find mushrooms use another vegetable. You can use artichoke hearts in this dish, as well as asparagus.

There's a famous poem by Cesar Vallejo that says "There are blows in life, so strong, I don't know…" and that small phrase always comes to mind when I'm dealing with an event that frustrates me. They are moments that no one wants to live but they must be overcome in some way, right? Isabel Allende confesses that she calms her fears and frustrations by eating bowls or arroz con leche and drinking hot chocolate in large amounts. Evidently, turning to food to calm our nerves and feel better is normal behavior. It must be because we subconsciously return to early stages in life when we were calmed by warm milk or sweets. For example, when I feel like this I get a craving for mushroom and red pepper risotto. It must be the carbs in the rice, plus the vegetables and the parmesan cheese that magically bring me to a state of serenity and color. Would you like to try this creamy risotto and tell us how you feel after you’ve eaten it?

If you want, add pieces of goat cheese at the end.

Directions

  • 1 Heat the vegetable oil in a pot over medium heat. Add the onion and leek, and then stir frequently until they appear transparent. Add the pepper and keep cooking. Finally add the rice and continue stirring until it looks clear. Season with salt and pepper to taste.
  • 2 Pour in the wine and let boil until it reduces. Begin adding ladles of broth, lightly covering each time and stirring constantly until it has evaporated. Add more and continue doing this until the rice is al dente, about 20-25 minutes.
  • 3 Separately, heat the rest of the oil in a saucepan. Sauté the garlic and when it begins to give off an aroma add the mushrooms and sauté until they're cooked. Season with salt and pepper and finally add the chopped parsley. Pour the mushrooms into the risotto.
  • 4 To serve, add the micromix of lettuce or baby arugula over each portion of risotto and sprinkle with parmesan cheese.

There's a famous poem by Cesar Vallejo that says "There are blows in life, so strong, I don't know…" and that small phrase always comes to mind when I'm dealing with an event that frustrates me. They are moments that no one wants to live but they must be overcome in some way, right? Isabel Allende confesses that she calms her fears and frustrations by eating bowls or arroz con leche and drinking hot chocolate in large amounts. Evidently, turning to food to calm our nerves and feel better is normal behavior. It must be because we subconsciously return to early stages in life when we were calmed by warm milk or sweets. For example, when I feel like this I get a craving for mushroom and red pepper risotto. It must be the carbs in the rice, plus the vegetables and the parmesan cheese that magically bring me to a state of serenity and color. Would you like to try this creamy risotto and tell us how you feel after you’ve eaten it?

Rate and Comment

Morena Cuadra Morena Cuadra
September 16, 2015

There's a famous poem by Cesar Vallejo that says "There are blows in life, so strong, I don't know…" and that small phrase always comes to mind when I'm dealing with an event that frustrates me. They are moments that no one wants to live but they must be overcome in some way, right? Isabel Allende confesses that she calms her fears and frustrations by eating bowls or arroz con leche and drinking hot chocolate in large amounts. Evidently, turning to food to calm our nerves and feel better is normal behavior. It must be because we subconsciously return to early stages in life when we were calmed by warm milk or sweets. For example, when I feel like this I get a craving for mushroom and red pepper risotto. It must be the carbs in the rice, plus the vegetables and the parmesan cheese that magically bring me to a state of serenity and color. Would you like to try this creamy risotto and tell us how you feel after you’ve eaten it?