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Lupini Beans Ceviche

  • Prep 20 min
  • Total 30 min
  • Ingredients 9
  • Servings 2

Ingredients

2
cups of cooked lupini beans
2
tablespoons red onion, chopped into thin slices
1/2
cup of lime juice
1
teaspoon of aji amarillo paste
1
tablespoon of olive oil
1
tablespoon of chopped parsley
Salt to taste
1
cup cherry tomatoes
1/2
cooked sweet potato, cubed

Nutrition Information

NUTRITION INFORMATION PER SERVING

Serving Size: 1 Serving
% Daily Value
% Daily Value*:
Exchanges:
Free
*Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet.
No nutrition information available for this recipe

Expert Tips

To cook the lupini beans you must first soak them for 24 hours in cold water to remove their bitterness. During this time period, change the water several times. Place them in a pot full of water and bring to a boil. Change the water and repeat this procedure once more. Then, cook them for about two hours until they're soft.

In Peru there exists an Andean legume called “Chocho” or “Tarwi.” Known as lupini beans in English, this legume is very rich in vegetable protein but requires a long cooking process. It's commonly found already packaged, since it's easier to prepare it that way, but if you buy the dry grains you'll need to soak them for a period of time, almost like chickpeas. The only drawback to this legume is that it's extremely bitter and requires soaking for a long period of time in order to be edible. Its bitterness is a natural result of the plant's defenses, as it protects the lupini from predators, and even the water used to soak the grain is used as an insecticide both at home and in the field. Its scientific name, lupinus, is due to the bitterness of the fruit of the plant, and when it's consumed without removing this acrid taste it can cause nausea. In Europe there’s a a legume that’s almost identical, known as lupinus albus, or “altramuz” in Spain and lupini in other countries. Its origin has been traced to ancient Egypt, but that’s just one of the 300 varieties of lupines that exist. Once it’s cooked, it's used in soups and stews, salads, ceviches and many other dishes. This is a recipe for a vegetarian ceviche using the lupini beans.

The easiest thing to do is to buy them packaged and ready to eat. You can find them in Italian shops or shops that sell gourmet products.

You can also order them online, either packaged or cooked.

Directions

  • 1 In a bowl, combine the lupini beans with the onion, lime juice, pepper, olive oil, parsley and salt.
  • 2 Before serving, add the cherry tomatoes, cut in half.
  • 3 Serve with sweet potatoes cut into cubes and at room temperature.

In Peru there exists an Andean legume called “Chocho” or “Tarwi.” Known as lupini beans in English, this legume is very rich in vegetable protein but requires a long cooking process. It's commonly found already packaged, since it's easier to prepare it that way, but if you buy the dry grains you'll need to soak them for a period of time, almost like chickpeas. The only drawback to this legume is that it's extremely bitter and requires soaking for a long period of time in order to be edible. Its bitterness is a natural result of the plant's defenses, as it protects the lupini from predators, and even the water used to soak the grain is used as an insecticide both at home and in the field. Its scientific name, lupinus, is due to the bitterness of the fruit of the plant, and when it's consumed without removing this acrid taste it can cause nausea. In Europe there’s a a legume that’s almost identical, known as lupinus albus, or “altramuz” in Spain and lupini in other countries. Its origin has been traced to ancient Egypt, but that’s just one of the 300 varieties of lupines that exist. Once it’s cooked, it's used in soups and stews, salads, ceviches and many other dishes. This is a recipe for a vegetarian ceviche using the lupini beans.

Rate and Comment

Morena Cuadra Morena Cuadra
September 28, 2015

In Peru there exists an Andean legume called “Chocho” or “Tarwi.” Known as lupini beans in English, this legume is very rich in vegetable protein but requires a long cooking process. It's commonly found already packaged, since it's easier to prepare it that way, but if you buy the dry grains you'll need to soak them for a period of time, almost like chickpeas. The only drawback to this legume is that it's extremely bitter and requires soaking for a long period of time in order to be edible. Its bitterness is a natural result of the plant's defenses, as it protects the lupini from predators, and even the water used to soak the grain is used as an insecticide both at home and in the field. Its scientific name, lupinus, is due to the bitterness of the fruit of the plant, and when it's consumed without removing this acrid taste it can cause nausea. In Europe there’s a a legume that’s almost identical, known as lupinus albus, or “altramuz” in Spain and lupini in other countries. Its origin has been traced to ancient Egypt, but that’s just one of the 300 varieties of lupines that exist. Once it’s cooked, it's used in soups and stews, salads, ceviches and many other dishes. This is a recipe for a vegetarian ceviche using the lupini beans.