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How to Make Capirotada

  • Prep 30 min
  • Total 60 min
  • Ingredients 14
  • Servings 6

Ingredients

6
croissants
1 1/2
lb piloncillo or brown sugar syrup
1
tablespoon fresh orange zest (1 medium orange)
1 1/2
cinnamon sticks
2
cloves
1/4
teaspoon nutmeg
1/4
teaspoon allspice
1/2
cup orange juice
2
cups of water
2
oz of crushed nuts
2
oz of baked pine nuts
2
oz of peanuts
1
cup grated Manchego cheese or white Monterrey Jack cheese
1
cup grated swiss cheese

Nutrition Information

NUTRITION INFORMATION PER SERVING

Serving Size: 1 Serving
Calories
875.5
% Daily Value
Total Fat
33.3g
51%
Saturated Fat
11.9g
59%
Cholesterol
54.5mg
18%
Sodium
303.1mg
13%
Potassium
439.4mg
13%
Total Carbohydrate
133.5g
44%
Dietary Fiber
3.3g
13%
Sugars
116.0g
Protein
17.4g
% Daily Value*:
Vitamin C
19.90%
20%
Calcium
40.50%
40%
Iron
15.90%
16%
Exchanges:
*Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet.

Expert Tips

Brown sugar syrup (piloncillo or panela de azúcar) can be found in supermarkets that carry Latin products.

To celebrate Easter, one of the traditional dishes that my great grandmother Doña Carlotita, or how we used to call her: "La Mamá Grande", used to cook for us was the Capirotada Sonorense: a simple, yet flavorful dish with day-old bolillo bread fried in shortening, peanuts and Manchego cheese. Capirotada is a dish that comes from Mexican cuisine and each region has its own version. In my version of Capirotada I use toasted croissants instead of fried bolillo to avoid the use of pork shortening and reduce the amount of fat, while at the same time adjusting it to my family's taste. I'm a fan of going back to those recipes from the past and giving them a modern twist to entice my family, who didn't grow with these flavors, to try them and introduce new flavors to their usual diet. I invite you to try this new version of Capirotada, whose flavors are similar to the delicious cheese pastries, or the honey and nut Danish buns. Dare to bring a blast from the past straight out of the famous collection of recipes from my Mamá Grande. Let's get cooking!

Pine nuts taste much better when you brown them in a saucepan for a few minutes.

Piloncillo syrup can be made in advance. If you have leftover honey this can be use as a substitute for maple syrup for pancakes or hot cakes.

Capirotada tastes better hot or warm, and it can be serve as part of breakfast or as a dessert.

You can accompany it with cold milk or a delicious café con leche (coffee with milk).

Directions

  • 1 Cut croissants in uniform pieces, place on a baking tray, and toast for a few minutes on high heat in your oven; when ready, remove and let cool.
  • 2 Place a medium pot on the burner; add the brown sugar syrup, orange zest, cinnamon, clove, nutmeg, allspice, orange juice and water. Stir well, bringing the ingredients to a boil at low heat for 30 minutes until honey forms a quickly dissolving ribbon, which means getting liquid syrup without syrup becoming a caramel.
  • 3 Preheat oven to 450ºF.
  • 4 Place toasted croissant pieces inside the pot or an oven safe dish making sure to leave space. Pour and bathe bread with the honey, piloncillo and orange juice, making sure you cover the bread well without soaking it too much.
  • 5 Add the nuts, pine nuts and peanuts; bathe the bread again with a little more honey.
  • 6 Finally, add the cheeses and bake for 10 to 15 minutes until cheeses are melted, and capirotada turns golden.
  • 7 You can serve it hot or cold.

To celebrate Easter it is important to know how to make capirotada. One of the traditional dishes that my great grandmother Doña Carlotita, or how we used to call her: "La Mamá Grande", used to cook for us was the Capirotada Sonorense: a simple, yet flavorful dish with day-old bolillo bread fried in shortening, peanuts and Manchego cheese. Capirotada is a dish that comes from Mexican cuisine and each region has its own version. In my version of Capirotada I use toasted croissants instead of fried bolillo to avoid the use of pork shortening and reduce the amount of fat, while at the same time adjusting it to my family's taste. I'm a fan of going back to those recipes from the past and giving them a modern twist to entice my family, who didn't grow with these flavors, to try them and introduce new flavors to their usual diet. I invite you to try this new version of Capirotada, whose flavors are similar to the delicious cheese pastries, or the honey and nut Danish buns. Dare to bring a blast from the past straight out of the famous collection of recipes from my Mamá Grande. Let's get cooking!

Rate and Comment

Adriana Martin Adriana Martin
October 14, 2016

To celebrate Easter it is important to know how to make capirotada. One of the traditional dishes that my great grandmother Doña Carlotita, or how we used to call her: "La Mamá Grande", used to cook for us was the Capirotada Sonorense: a simple, yet flavorful dish with day-old bolillo bread fried in shortening, peanuts and Manchego cheese. Capirotada is a dish that comes from Mexican cuisine and each region has its own version. In my version of Capirotada I use toasted croissants instead of fried bolillo to avoid the use of pork shortening and reduce the amount of fat, while at the same time adjusting it to my family's taste. I'm a fan of going back to those recipes from the past and giving them a modern twist to entice my family, who didn't grow with these flavors, to try them and introduce new flavors to their usual diet. I invite you to try this new version of Capirotada, whose flavors are similar to the delicious cheese pastries, or the honey and nut Danish buns. Dare to bring a blast from the past straight out of the famous collection of recipes from my Mamá Grande. Let's get cooking!