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Homemade Mantecaditos

  • Prep 20 min
  • Total 12 hr 20 min
  • Ingredients 6
  • Servings 12

Ingredients

1
cup (8 oz) of vegetable oil or 1/2 cup peanut oil
2 1/2
cups all-purpose flour
1
cup brown sugar
1
teaspoon of salt
Cinnamon to taste
Powder sugar or icing, as desired

Nutrition Information

NUTRITION INFORMATION PER SERVING

Serving Size: 1 Serving
% Daily Value
% Daily Value*:
Exchanges:
Free
*Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet.
No nutrition information available for this recipe

Expert Tips

Blogger provides us with this recipe- Mantecaditos: Tasty bite size-cookies Birthdays, weddings, anniversaries, Christenings or Christmas, whatever the reason for your celebration, mantecaditos are a delicious option. The history of these little cookies dates back to the 16th century Spain, as did the tradition of eating 12 grapes on New Year's Eve. But you don’t have to wait to see Santa to enjoy this irresistible galletica. This historically Andalusian dessert has spread to other regions where they are customized to the people’s liking, like the Puerto Rican version that uses guava, or the Dominican-style mantecadito that uses peanut oil. Despite its different interpretations, the basic ingredients are flour, lard and sugar. But if you want less fat, you can replace the lard with vegetable oil or peanut oil. The mantecadito is not like the polvorón cookie. Although it’s a derivative, polvorónes have almonds and its shape is more elongated. Imagine savoring one with a cup of cappuccino or tea Qué Rica Vida

It’s recommended to let the cookies sit 12 hours before eating, and it’s even better to wait for an entire day. Do not cover the cookies while hot.

Directions

  • 1 Preheat the oven to 365°F. Grease large cookie sheet enough to hold 12 cookies or mantecaditos. In a large bowl, mix the dry ingredients: flour, sugar, salt and cinnamon.
  • 2 Stir in peanut or vegetable oil, using a fork mix to help incorporate all ingredients. Once having a fine consistency, make small balls about a 1/2 inch in size. Place on cookie sheet about 1-inch apart.
  • 3 Bake for 20 minutes or until lightly browned, taking care not to burn them. Remove the tray, and let cool for at least 12 hours. Sprinkle with powder sugar or icing, as desired.

Blogger provides us with this recipe- Mantecaditos: Tasty bite size-cookies Birthdays, weddings, anniversaries, Christenings or Christmas, whatever the reason for your celebration, mantecaditos are a delicious option. The history of these little cookies dates back to the 16th century Spain, as did the tradition of eating 12 grapes on New Year's Eve. But you don’t have to wait to see Santa to enjoy this irresistible galletica. This historically Andalusian dessert has spread to other regions where they are customized to the people’s liking, like the Puerto Rican version that uses guava, or the Dominican-style mantecadito that uses peanut oil. Despite its different interpretations, the basic ingredients are flour, lard and sugar. But if you want less fat, you can replace the lard with vegetable oil or peanut oil. The mantecadito is not like the polvorón cookie. Although it’s a derivative, polvorónes have almonds and its shape is more elongated. Imagine savoring one with a cup of cappuccino or tea Qué Rica Vida

Rate and Comment

Greyza Baptista Greyza Baptista
September 10, 2015

Blogger provides us with this recipe- Mantecaditos: Tasty bite size-cookies Birthdays, weddings, anniversaries, Christenings or Christmas, whatever the reason for your celebration, mantecaditos are a delicious option. The history of these little cookies dates back to the 16th century Spain, as did the tradition of eating 12 grapes on New Year's Eve. But you don’t have to wait to see Santa to enjoy this irresistible galletica. This historically Andalusian dessert has spread to other regions where they are customized to the people’s liking, like the Puerto Rican version that uses guava, or the Dominican-style mantecadito that uses peanut oil. Despite its different interpretations, the basic ingredients are flour, lard and sugar. But if you want less fat, you can replace the lard with vegetable oil or peanut oil. The mantecadito is not like the polvorón cookie. Although it’s a derivative, polvorónes have almonds and its shape is more elongated. Imagine savoring one with a cup of cappuccino or tea Qué Rica Vida