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Flan Borracho

  • Prep 10 min
  • Total 3 hr 0 min
  • Ingredients 7
  • Servings 6

Ingredients

3/4
cup sugar
1
can (12 oz) sweetened condensed milk
1 1/2
cups whole milk
6
eggs
1 1/2
teaspoons vanilla
1/8
teaspoons salt
2
tablespoons dark Rum

Nutrition Information

NUTRITION INFORMATION PER SERVING

Serving Size: 1 Serving
% Daily Value
% Daily Value*:
Exchanges:
Free
*Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet.
No nutrition information available for this recipe

Expert Tips

For quicker cooling time use individual ramekins.

There are few recipes that can bring back childhood memories in Spain like flan. My grandmother used to make flan most Sundays for the entire family. She made big pans of flan, not small ramekins that yield an individual serving. After we moved to the United States, my mother carried on her tradition of making weekly flans. She made a smaller recipe for us. When we had company over, she loved to show them her Spanish culinary skills and would always make a flan. We got invited to a friend’s house? A flan it was there too. As I got older and learned my way around the kitchen, I began attempting to make flan too. The funny thing is that there are many ways to make a flan. In Latin American recipes, condensed milk is used; while whole milk is used in recipes from Spain. I’ve come to appreciate the consistency of flan made with condensed milk and whole milk together. For me, this is a happy medium that pleases all my Latino friends combined. Now that I’m an adult, I love making a grownup drunken flan, or borracho as we call it in Spanish. Flans are simple to make but it is a recipe one must pay attention while cooking or you can easily burn the caramel sauce.

You can sprinkle shaved toasted almonds or shredded coconut on your flan for extra crunch.

Directions

  • 1 Place oven rack in lower 3rd of your oven. Preheat oven to 325°F.
  • 2 Meanwhile, make caramel sauce. Over medium-low heat, melt sugar, stirring often with a wooden spoon until the sugar is golden brown.
  • 3 Pour caramel (melted sugar) into a baking pan. Suggestion: either an oval flan pan (about 9” round with a whole in the middle and 3” tall) or 9” square pan. Spread caramel quickly and carefully before it hardens evenly to coat bottom of pan.
  • 4 In a mixing bowl, mix all other ingredients until smooth. Pour mixture in the pan on top of the caramel coated pan.
  • 5 Set up a water bath (baño Maria) by placing flan in larger baking pan of warm water. The water should come up half way up the sides of the flan dish.
  • 6 Bake for about 1 hour to 1 hour 15 minutes. After the first hour, put a knife or a poking stick in the center of the flan. If the knife comes out clean and the flan wiggles firm, it is done. Take out of oven and let cool.
  • 7 Once cooled at room temperature, refrigerate at least one hour.
  • 8 Cover flan pan with larger plate or flat dish. Using a knife, separate flan from dish sides and flip over. Slowly wiggle flan down and serve.

There are few recipes that can bring back childhood memories in Spain like flan. My grandmother used to make flan most Sundays for the entire family. She made big pans of flan, not small ramekins that yield an individual serving. After we moved to the United States, my mother carried on her tradition of making weekly flans. She made a smaller recipe for us. When we had company over, she loved to show them her Spanish culinary skills and would always make a flan. We got invited to a friend’s house? A flan it was there too. As I got older and learned my way around the kitchen, I began attempting to make flan too. The funny thing is that there are many ways to make a flan. In Latin American recipes, condensed milk is used; while whole milk is used in recipes from Spain. I’ve come to appreciate the consistency of flan made with condensed milk and whole milk together. For me, this is a happy medium that pleases all my Latino friends combined. Now that I’m an adult, I love making a grownup drunken flan, or borracho as we call it in Spanish. Flans are simple to make but it is a recipe one must pay attention while cooking or you can easily burn the caramel sauce.

Rate and Comment

Laura Fuentes Laura Fuentes
September 24, 2015

There are few recipes that can bring back childhood memories in Spain like flan. My grandmother used to make flan most Sundays for the entire family. She made big pans of flan, not small ramekins that yield an individual serving. After we moved to the United States, my mother carried on her tradition of making weekly flans. She made a smaller recipe for us. When we had company over, she loved to show them her Spanish culinary skills and would always make a flan. We got invited to a friend’s house? A flan it was there too. As I got older and learned my way around the kitchen, I began attempting to make flan too. The funny thing is that there are many ways to make a flan. In Latin American recipes, condensed milk is used; while whole milk is used in recipes from Spain. I’ve come to appreciate the consistency of flan made with condensed milk and whole milk together. For me, this is a happy medium that pleases all my Latino friends combined. Now that I’m an adult, I love making a grownup drunken flan, or borracho as we call it in Spanish. Flans are simple to make but it is a recipe one must pay attention while cooking or you can easily burn the caramel sauce.