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Fish and Seafood Soup

  • Prep 20 min
  • Total 2 hr 0 min
  • Ingredients 17
  • Servings 4

Ingredients

The Stock

1
fish head (from the whole fish in Step 2 list below)
1/2
gallon water
1/2
white onion, roughly chopped
3
garlic cloves, mashed
1/2
green pepper, seeded
1
ají dulce seeded and diced
1/2
leek, coarsely chopped
1
ripe tomato, skin removed and seeded, coarsely chopped, if desired
1/2
cup white wine, if desired
1
cilantro sprig

The Seafood and Shrimp

1
lb prawns, shells intact and with head if possible
1
bag of mussels
1
lb squid, cleaned and cut into rings
1/2
lb scallops
1
whole fish (the one you desire), head removed and saved; cut into steaks
2
yucas coarsely chopped or another vegetable of your own choosing
1
bunch cilantro, minced

Nutrition Information

NUTRITION INFORMATION PER SERVING

Serving Size: 1 Serving
% Daily Value
% Daily Value*:
Exchanges:
Free
*Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet.
No nutrition information available for this recipe

Expert Tips

You can add any vegetables you like to this stew. Serve it with tostones (patacones) and slices of lemon.

Every country in Latin America has a variation on this classic dish. To add to its charm, it is also full of many delicious and nourishing ingredients. This delicious seafood and fish recipe can lift anyone’s spirits, especially in the wintertime. In Ecuador there is an oven made sopa de marisco made from grated plátanos verdes (plantains) and served over a sofrito. The traditional way to serve it is in individual ceramic dishes. In Venezuela the Fosforera, or Siete Potencias as it is also known, is very well know. The stock itself is made from a variety of seafood including octopus and crab. Some people believe it is an aphrodisiac, and other’s believe it can make a sick person get better. In Colombia there are different varieties depending on how close you are to the sea, but it is always a fantastic mix of the best that Colombia’s land and1 waters have to offer. There are so many varieties of this soup that it would be impossible to list them all. What I can say for certain is that Sopa de Marisco is good for the soul. I hope this one will make you want to lick your fingers, and leave you wanting more! Let’s take a look at how it is made.

Directions

  • 1 Wash prawns very well and remove shells and heads. Set prawns aside for second step of recipe, below. Save shells and heads for the broth. Boil the fish head, prawn shells and heads with the onion, garlic, green pepper, ají dulce, leeks, cilantro and tomato for 45 minutes. Strain stock into a bowl; remove any solids, and reserve it.
  • 2 In another saucepan boil scallops and squid. Stir in fish, shrimp, mussels, yuca (or any desired vegetable ); add salt and/or pepper as desired. If desired stir in white wine. Bring to a boil and let simmer for 45 minutes.
  • 3 When ready to serve the soup, place the fish and seafood you cooked on second step into a bowl and pour the stock from the first step. Sprinkle the cilantro on top before serving.

Every country in Latin America has a variation on this classic dish. To add to its charm, it is also full of many delicious and nourishing ingredients. This delicious seafood and fish recipe can lift anyone’s spirits, especially in the wintertime. In Ecuador there is an oven made sopa de marisco made from grated plátanos verdes (plantains) and served over a sofrito. The traditional way to serve it is in individual ceramic dishes. In Venezuela the Fosforera, or Siete Potencias as it is also known, is very well know. The stock itself is made from a variety of seafood including octopus and crab. Some people believe it is an aphrodisiac, and other’s believe it can make a sick person get better. In Colombia there are different varieties depending on how close you are to the sea, but it is always a fantastic mix of the best that Colombia’s land and1 waters have to offer. There are so many varieties of this soup that it would be impossible to list them all. What I can say for certain is that Sopa de Marisco is good for the soul. I hope this one will make you want to lick your fingers, and leave you wanting more! Let’s take a look at how it is made.

Rate and Comment

Greyza Baptista Greyza Baptista
September 28, 2015

Every country in Latin America has a variation on this classic dish. To add to its charm, it is also full of many delicious and nourishing ingredients. This delicious seafood and fish recipe can lift anyone’s spirits, especially in the wintertime. In Ecuador there is an oven made sopa de marisco made from grated plátanos verdes (plantains) and served over a sofrito. The traditional way to serve it is in individual ceramic dishes. In Venezuela the Fosforera, or Siete Potencias as it is also known, is very well know. The stock itself is made from a variety of seafood including octopus and crab. Some people believe it is an aphrodisiac, and other’s believe it can make a sick person get better. In Colombia there are different varieties depending on how close you are to the sea, but it is always a fantastic mix of the best that Colombia’s land and1 waters have to offer. There are so many varieties of this soup that it would be impossible to list them all. What I can say for certain is that Sopa de Marisco is good for the soul. I hope this one will make you want to lick your fingers, and leave you wanting more! Let’s take a look at how it is made.