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Easter Rosca

  • Prep 20 min
  • Total 4 hr 20 min
  • Ingredients 18
  • Servings 10

Ingredients

1/4
cup brewer’s yeast
3/4
cup sugar (200 gr)
4 1/2
cups all-purpose flour
3/4
cup milk
1/2
cup lard (100 g)
3
eggs
1
teaspoon vanilla
1
cup pastry cream
3/4
cup dulce de leche
1/4
cup slivered almonds for garnish, if desired

Orange syrup:

3
tablespoons powdered sugar
1
tablespoon orange juice

Pastry cream:

2
cups milk
1
cinnamon stick
4
egg yolks
6
tablespoons sugar (80 g)
1
teaspoon vanilla
3
tablespoons plus a teaspoon cornstarch (50 g)

Nutrition Information

NUTRITION INFORMATION PER SERVING

Serving Size: 1 Serving
% Daily Value
% Daily Value*:
Exchanges:
Free
*Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet.
No nutrition information available for this recipe

Expert Tips

Instead of placing an empty can in center of ring, you can make a ball of aluminum foil.

As Holy Week approaches, my daughters start to dream about the delicious Rosca de Pascua (Easter bread ring) we make at home. Everyone participates - one of them organizes the work area and ingredients, another one mixes, beats and kneads, while the other one is in charge of garnish, and I supervise them. But the best part of it is to enjoy it with a delicious cup of creamy café con leche. The Rosca de Pascua originated in Spain, and is called rosca for its ring shape. It’s a version of pan dulce for this very special season. There’s an endless variety of recipes for Rosca de Pascua and different methods of garnishing and filling it. Any way you make it, it’s just irresistible!

If you wish, garnish the ring by topping it with slivered almonds, powdered sugar, pastry cream, chocolate eggs or cherries.

Directions

  • 1 In mixing bowl, combine yeast with 2 tablespoons sugar, 4 tablespoons flour and 4 tablespoons warm milk. Mix and let it rest for 10 minutes in a warm area.
  • 2 Add lard and rest of the sugar to yeast mixture. Combine until all ingredients are well incorporated.
  • 3 Add eggs, one by one. Continue mixing and add vanilla essence (extract).
  • 4 Add remaining flour and milk alternately until you have a soft dough.
  • 5 Rub oil onto your hands; oil the dough with your hands to keep from sticking to bowl.
  • 6 Let dough rest in warm area for 2 hours.
  • 7 Preheat oven to 350°F.
  • 8 Divide dough and shape into two balls, and then stretch dough into a rectangular shape.
  • 9 Place pastry cream and dulce de leche in center (lengthwise) of the two dough rectangles you previously stretched out.
  • 10 Grab one edge and fold it back into the center, covering the cream, and do the same thing with the other edge. Repeat process with the other rectangle.
  • 11 Bring the two closed rectangles together to form a circle. Carefully place ring on a buttered and floured cookie tray. You may place an empty can in center to keep edges from coming together. Let it rest for 1 1/2 hours.
  • 12 Bake for 35 minutes.
  • 13 Remove ring from the oven, and pour orange syrup over it while it’s still hot.
  • 14 Pastry cream: Place milk and cinnamon stick in a small pot until it comes to a boil. In another pot, combine egg yolks and sugar over medium heat. Gradually add vanilla. Incorporate the cornstarch and mix vigorously. Add hot milk and continue mixing. When it comes to a boil, remove pot from heat and continue beating until it cools.
  • 15 Orange syrup: In a small pot, combine powdered sugar and orange juice over low heat until you have a syrup that is not too thick.

As Holy Week approaches, my daughters start to dream about the delicious Rosca de Pascua (Easter bread ring) we make at home. Everyone participates - one of them organizes the work area and ingredients, another one mixes, beats and kneads, while the other one is in charge of garnish, and I supervise them. But the best part of it is to enjoy it with a delicious cup of creamy café con leche. The Rosca de Pascua originated in Spain, and is called rosca for its ring shape. It’s a version of pan dulce for this very special season. There’s an endless variety of recipes for Rosca de Pascua and different methods of garnishing and filling it. Any way you make it, it’s just irresistible!

Rate and Comment

Martha Salas Martha Salas
September 11, 2015

As Holy Week approaches, my daughters start to dream about the delicious Rosca de Pascua (Easter bread ring) we make at home. Everyone participates - one of them organizes the work area and ingredients, another one mixes, beats and kneads, while the other one is in charge of garnish, and I supervise them. But the best part of it is to enjoy it with a delicious cup of creamy café con leche. The Rosca de Pascua originated in Spain, and is called rosca for its ring shape. It’s a version of pan dulce for this very special season. There’s an endless variety of recipes for Rosca de Pascua and different methods of garnishing and filling it. Any way you make it, it’s just irresistible!