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Dulce de Leche Brownies

  • Prep 60 min
  • Total 1 hr 10 min
  • Ingredients 9
  • Servings 8

Ingredients

4
oz butter
8
ounces of unsweetened or semi-sweet chocolate
2
large eggs
1/2
teaspoon of vanilla extract
3/4
cup sugar
3/4
cup flour
1/4
teaspoon baking powder
1/4
teaspoon sea salt
1
cup of dulce de leche (see recipe on the tip if you can’t find dulce de leche to buy)

Nutrition Information

NUTRITION INFORMATION PER SERVING

Serving Size: 1 Serving
% Daily Value
% Daily Value*:
Exchanges:
Free
*Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet.
No nutrition information available for this recipe

Expert Tips

If you have a hard time finding dulce de leche in your city, you can easily make it at home. Buy a can of condensed milk and place it in a small pot with boiling water for two hours (1 hour on each side turning it carefully and, as it boils, the water should reach the top of the can). Remove from the heat, allow the can to cool totally and open it.

If you ask my kids, husband or friends which gift I most like to receive for my birthday, they will probably all agree. I just love desserts and sweets, especially brownies and dulce de leche! I have a fascination for desserts and love tweaking flavors. I dare to combine traditional ingredients from different cultures and, though the traditional brownie is from here and dulce de leche is not, could you go wrong with chocolate and dulce de leche? Of course not! The brownie is a traditional staple of American cuisine. Sometimes it is covered in fudge and can include chopped nuts, chocolate, butterscotch or peanut butter. It is believed that the name “brownie” first appeared in 1896. On the other hand, dulce de leche, a milk-based caramel sauce, is a traditional Latin American sweet. It is consumed in every Latin American country and in regions with large Latin American communities, like Spain. This product goes by a number of different names with local variations, depending on the country where it is consumed. It is widely used in desserts like alfajores (shortbread cookies), cuchuflíes (thin wafers), ice creams and cakes. In honor of both my adoptive country and my native country, I made dark chocolate brownies with dulce de leche that are simply to die for! Here’s the recipe party.

Directions

  • 1 Preheat oven to 350°F.
  • 2 Grease an 8x8 inch glass baking dish. You can cover the inside with aluminum foil allowing easy removal.
  • 3 Melt chocolate and butter together in a water bath. Remove it and let the chocolate mix cool. When it cools, use a hand mixer and add the eggs one by one, mixing it well. Then add the sugar and the vanilla extract.
  • 4 In a different bowl, sift the flour, the baking powder and the salt.
  • 5 Stir the flour mix with the chocolate mix just enough to incorporate evenly. Don’t mix them. The batter thickens.
  • 6 Pour brownie mix in the prepared baking dish. Use a rubber spatula to spread half the dulce de leche over the batter.
  • 7 Bake for 40 minutes. Suggestion: check on what’s being baked about 5 minutes before baking time is up, because each oven is different. Also altitudes differ, as well as the climate, may affect cooking time. Insert a toothpick or knife in center of the brownies. Will be ready when toothpick or knife comes out clean.
  • 8 Remove brownies from oven and let cool on a cookie rack.
  • 9 Cut brownies and top with the rest of the dulce de leche just before serving.

If you ask my kids, husband or friends which gift I most like to receive for my birthday, they will probably all agree. I just love desserts and sweets, especially brownies and dulce de leche! I have a fascination for desserts and love tweaking flavors. I dare to combine traditional ingredients from different cultures and, though the traditional brownie is from here and dulce de leche is not, could you go wrong with chocolate and dulce de leche? Of course not! The brownie is a traditional staple of American cuisine. Sometimes it is covered in fudge and can include chopped nuts, chocolate, butterscotch or peanut butter. It is believed that the name “brownie” first appeared in 1896. On the other hand, dulce de leche, a milk-based caramel sauce, is a traditional Latin American sweet. It is consumed in every Latin American country and in regions with large Latin American communities, like Spain. This product goes by a number of different names with local variations, depending on the country where it is consumed. It is widely used in desserts like alfajores (shortbread cookies), cuchuflíes (thin wafers), ice creams and cakes. In honor of both my adoptive country and my native country, I made dark chocolate brownies with dulce de leche that are simply to die for! Here’s the recipe party.

Rate and Comment

Romina Tibytt Romina Tibytt
September 28, 2015

If you ask my kids, husband or friends which gift I most like to receive for my birthday, they will probably all agree. I just love desserts and sweets, especially brownies and dulce de leche! I have a fascination for desserts and love tweaking flavors. I dare to combine traditional ingredients from different cultures and, though the traditional brownie is from here and dulce de leche is not, could you go wrong with chocolate and dulce de leche? Of course not! The brownie is a traditional staple of American cuisine. Sometimes it is covered in fudge and can include chopped nuts, chocolate, butterscotch or peanut butter. It is believed that the name “brownie” first appeared in 1896. On the other hand, dulce de leche, a milk-based caramel sauce, is a traditional Latin American sweet. It is consumed in every Latin American country and in regions with large Latin American communities, like Spain. This product goes by a number of different names with local variations, depending on the country where it is consumed. It is widely used in desserts like alfajores (shortbread cookies), cuchuflíes (thin wafers), ice creams and cakes. In honor of both my adoptive country and my native country, I made dark chocolate brownies with dulce de leche that are simply to die for! Here’s the recipe party.