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Buñuelos

  • Prep 2 hr 0 min
  • Total 2 hr 30 min
  • Ingredients 7
  • Servings 20

Ingredients

2
cups flour
1/2
teaspoon salt
1
tablespoon vegetable oil or melted butter
1
teaspoon baking powder
1
teaspoon sugar
1
cup water
Honey, piloncillo syrup or sugar with cinnamon to taste, to serve with

Nutrition Information

NUTRITION INFORMATION PER SERVING

Serving Size: 1 Serving
% Daily Value
% Daily Value*:
Exchanges:
Free
*Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet.
No nutrition information available for this recipe

Expert Tips

If you don’t want to knead the buñuelos, you may buy flour tortillas and fry them in very hot oil. The final result is just about the same as if you had prepared the dough.

Buñuelos, prestiños or tortas fritas. In my home, it’s hard for us to agree on the name of this fried dough made of wheat flour, and then bathed in piloncillo (raw sugar) syrup or regular sugar with cinnamon. Prestiños or Mexican buñuelos – by the way, I should point out that they vary depending on the state where they are prepared - are an easy-to-make antojito, perfect to prepare with the family during the holiday season. My kids are already teenagers and, when I make buñuelos at home, they help me knead the dough and then bathe them in the syrup or sugar mixture. The frying ends up turning into a pleasant evening with the family, though it takes me longer to fry the buñuelos than what it takes the kids to devour them. The nice thing is to cook as a family!

The key so that the buñuelos don’t come out too greasy is for the oil to be very hot. You should use enough oil to fully cover the buñuelo. When they’re done, let them rest on a napkin or paper towel.

You can fry the buñuelos in a deep and wide pot, which will allow you to turn them over easily and avoid oil splatter.

Directions

  • 1 In glass bowl, place flour, salt, baking powder and sugar. Add oil and a little water. Mix and knead, adding the rest of the water, little by little.
  • 2 When you have a compact paste, cover with plastic wrap and let it rest in the refrigerator for 2 hours. Remove dough from the refrigerator, divide dough in pieces of about 2 centimeters and use your hands to shape into balls.
  • 3 Using a rolling pin, stretch out each ball on a flat surface, until you achieve the size you want. The buñuelo should be very thin.
  • 4 Fry the buñuelos in a skillet, carefully, in very hot oil approximately at 375°F.
  • 5 To serve them, bathe them in honey or piloncillo syrup. You may also sprinkle them with a mixture of cinnamon and sugar.

Buñuelos, prestiños or tortas fritas. In my home, it’s hard for us to agree on the name of this fried dough made of wheat flour, and then bathed in piloncillo (raw sugar) syrup or regular sugar with cinnamon. Prestiños or Mexican buñuelos – by the way, I should point out that they vary depending on the state where they are prepared - are an easy-to-make antojito, perfect to prepare with the family during the holiday season. My kids are already teenagers and, when I make buñuelos at home, they help me knead the dough and then bathe them in the syrup or sugar mixture. The frying ends up turning into a pleasant evening with the family, though it takes me longer to fry the buñuelos than what it takes the kids to devour them. The nice thing is to cook as a family!

Rate and Comment

Katia Ramírez Blankley Katia Ramírez Blankley
September 24, 2015

Buñuelos, prestiños or tortas fritas. In my home, it’s hard for us to agree on the name of this fried dough made of wheat flour, and then bathed in piloncillo (raw sugar) syrup or regular sugar with cinnamon. Prestiños or Mexican buñuelos – by the way, I should point out that they vary depending on the state where they are prepared - are an easy-to-make antojito, perfect to prepare with the family during the holiday season. My kids are already teenagers and, when I make buñuelos at home, they help me knead the dough and then bathe them in the syrup or sugar mixture. The frying ends up turning into a pleasant evening with the family, though it takes me longer to fry the buñuelos than what it takes the kids to devour them. The nice thing is to cook as a family!