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Bûche de Noël Yule Log

  • Prep 60 min
  • Total 5 hr 0 min
  • Ingredients 18
  • Servings 8

Ingredients

To make the cake:

10
eggs
1
lb sugar
2
tablespoons sugar
1
cup flour
3/4
cup powdered cocoa

To make the chocolate filling:

2/3
cup sugar
1/3
cup water
8
egg yolks
2
tablespoons candied orange zest
8
oz couverture chocolate
1
teaspoon Pisco or Grand Marnier
1 1/4
cup heavy cream
1
sheet of unflavored gelatin, soaked in cold water

To assemble:

Orange marmalade
2
cups whipped cream
1
tablespoon powdered cocoa
Meringues
Holiday decorations

Nutrition Information

NUTRITION INFORMATION PER SERVING

Serving Size: 1 Serving
% Daily Value
% Daily Value*:
Exchanges:
Free
*Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet.
No nutrition information available for this recipe

Expert Tips

If you make this dessert various hours in advance, keep it refrigerated instead of freezing.

The tradition of the Yule Log as a holiday recipe first began in northern Europe and has been passed down from ancient times. During the pre-Christian era, the winter solstice was celebrated with the burning of a ceremonial Yule log. Over time, the religious meaning was forgotten but the pagan traditions and superstitions lived on. In France, once the log was lit, it was doused with a glass of wine, and the family would gather round to sing while the Reveillon, or Christmas dinner, was prepared over the fire. It was believed that the ashes of the log were imbued with magical and medicinal powers. Eventually, logs and chimneys became scarce in some parts of the country, and a new tradition was born: a Christmas dessert in the shape of a log, to honor in some way the age-old custom. The Bûche de Noël or Yule Log has countless variations, but it has been modernized and now features creative designs and decorations that are limited only by the imagination of their creators. You can adorn your log with subtle Christmas ornaments or opt for the classic meringue-shaped “mushrooms.” This recipe, inspired by the creations of Chef Daniel Punchin, is a perfect recipe to add to your holiday dessert repertoire.

Serve with chocolate sauce and extra whipped cream.

You can also decorate your Yule Log with cookies, if you have a fresh-baked supply on hand.

Directions

  • 1 For the cake: Pre-heat the oven to 380°F.
  • 2 Separate the eggs and place the yolks in a bowl. Combine with one pound of sugar and beat with an electric mixer on high speed until pale and creamy in texture.
  • 3 In a second bowl, beat the egg whites until soft peaks form, add the two tablespoons of sugar, and use a spatula to carefully fold in the egg yolk mixture.
  • 4 Sift the flour and cocoa before adding to the combined egg mixture. Stir well and spread onto a baking pan lined with greased parchment paper.
  • 5 Bake for 12 minutes, remove from heat and let cool over a wire rack.
  • 6 For the Filling: Prepare simple syrup with the sugar and water. Heat until the mixture reaches 250°F (you can test if the syrup is done by pouring some into a cold glass of water; if it forms itself into a ball, it's ready). Be very careful to not touch the bubbling syrup to avoid any nasty burns!
  • 7 Meanwhile, beat the yolks with an electric beater until they're pale and frothy. Add the boiling syrup to the yolks and continue beating until the mixture has cooled.
  • 8 Melt the chocolate in a Bain Marie before adding to the mixture along with the orange peel, Pisco or Grand Marnier, and gelatin. The gelatin should be previously soaked in cold water, drained and melted over low heat.
  • 9 Separately, beat the cream until medium peaks form. When ready, carefully fold into the egg mixture.
  • 10 To assemble: Make sure to have a semi-circular mold ready. Cut strips from the baked sheet of cake to line the base and sides of the mold.
  • 11 Pour the chocolate mixture into the mold until it's half full; then add a second layer of cake and cover with orange marmalade. Adding the remaining chocolate filling, and cover with a final layer of cake.
  • 12 Cool this dessert in the freezer for around 4 hours, then unmold and decorate with whipped cream. Try using a fork or pastry comb to decorate the cream. Lightly dust with cocoa and adorn with a few holiday decorations.
  • 13 Serve this dessert over a mirror covered in powdered sugar for a snow-like effect.

The tradition of the Yule Log as a holiday recipe first began in northern Europe and has been passed down from ancient times. During the pre-Christian era, the winter solstice was celebrated with the burning of a ceremonial Yule log. Over time, the religious meaning was forgotten but the pagan traditions and superstitions lived on. In France, once the log was lit, it was doused with a glass of wine, and the family would gather round to sing while the Reveillon, or Christmas dinner, was prepared over the fire. It was believed that the ashes of the log were imbued with magical and medicinal powers. Eventually, logs and chimneys became scarce in some parts of the country, and a new tradition was born: a Christmas dessert in the shape of a log, to honor in some way the age-old custom. The Bûche de Noël or Yule Log has countless variations, but it has been modernized and now features creative designs and decorations that are limited only by the imagination of their creators. You can adorn your log with subtle Christmas ornaments or opt for the classic meringue-shaped “mushrooms.” This recipe, inspired by the creations of Chef Daniel Punchin, is a perfect recipe to add to your holiday dessert repertoire.

Rate and Comment

Morena Cuadra Morena Cuadra
September 27, 2015

The tradition of the Yule Log as a holiday recipe first began in northern Europe and has been passed down from ancient times. During the pre-Christian era, the winter solstice was celebrated with the burning of a ceremonial Yule log. Over time, the religious meaning was forgotten but the pagan traditions and superstitions lived on. In France, once the log was lit, it was doused with a glass of wine, and the family would gather round to sing while the Reveillon, or Christmas dinner, was prepared over the fire. It was believed that the ashes of the log were imbued with magical and medicinal powers. Eventually, logs and chimneys became scarce in some parts of the country, and a new tradition was born: a Christmas dessert in the shape of a log, to honor in some way the age-old custom. The Bûche de Noël or Yule Log has countless variations, but it has been modernized and now features creative designs and decorations that are limited only by the imagination of their creators. You can adorn your log with subtle Christmas ornaments or opt for the classic meringue-shaped “mushrooms.” This recipe, inspired by the creations of Chef Daniel Punchin, is a perfect recipe to add to your holiday dessert repertoire.