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Black Eyed Peas with Pork Chops

  • Prep 20 min
  • Total 1 hr 45 min
  • Ingredients 15
  • Servings 2

Ingredients

2
pork chops
2
tablespoons honey
2
tablespoons soy sauce
1
tablespoon mustard
Salt and pepper
1/2
pound black-eyed peas
1
bay leaf
1
sprig fresh thyme
2
tablespoons vegetable oil
1/2
cup onion, chopped
2
cloves garlic, minced
1
tomato, peeled, seeded, and chopped
1 1/2
cups kale
Juice of 1/2 lemon
1
tablespoon olive oil

Nutrition Information

NUTRITION INFORMATION PER SERVING

Serving Size: 1 Serving
% Daily Value
% Daily Value*:
Exchanges:
Free
*Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet.
No nutrition information available for this recipe

Expert Tips

When you prepare the beans, you can add 1/2 cup of chopped celery and 1/2 cup of chopped carrots.

I love black-eyed peas. In Peru we call them panamitos and they’re very popular, as in most countries in South America, though they’re all cooked differently. I think the name their best name in Spanish is frijoles carita or “bean face.” Whatever you call them, they’re incredible, delicious and comforting, making the perfect side for any broiled meat. In this case, I’ve prepared pork chops my way not in the traditional Southern style. For this recipe, I’ve turned to classic ingredients found in African American Soul Food, as is the case with black-eyed peas. Kale is another popular ingredient in the Southern U.S., same as chard. Corn, another delicious ingredient typically found in this cuisine, could be added in order to complement this dish, depending on how hungry your family is. Remember that pork must always be well cooked to prevent any health issues, but you must be careful that it doesn’t dry out in the oven. You don’t want to serve a piece of cardboard for dinner instead of a juicy piece of meat, combined perfectly with these delicious beans. Do you have a favorite pork chop recipe?

You can make ribs instead of pork chops and prepare them the same way, but only bake for 30 minutes.

If you want to keep the meal truly traditional, serve with a side of cornbread.

Directions

  • 1 Combine the honey, soy sauce, mustard, salt and pepper in a glass baking dish. Add the pork chops, drenching them in the marinade. Cover the container with plastic wrap and refrigerate for an hour or more. The longer you let them marinate, the better.
  • 2 Wash the black-eyed peas and put them in a pot over medium heat with enough water to cover them. Let them boil and lower the heat, add the bay and thyme, cook over low heat for 40 minutes.
  • 3 Heat the vegetable oil over medium heat in a saucepan and sauté the onions and garlic. Once they are well cooked and begin to brown, add the tomato and continue cooking until it comes apart. Pour this sauce in the pot with the beans and add salt/pepper to taste.
  • 4 Cook for 40 minutes or until they’re nice and soft, but be sure to add more water if necessary. They shouldn’t be dry.
  • 5 Preheat the oven to 350°F. Take the chops out of the fridge and bake for 45 minutes. Half way through the time, flip them and stir the marinade a bit. It should be golden brown and juicy, not dry when you’re done.
  • 6 Serve the pork chops in the juice over a bed of beans. Add a side of kale salad seasoned with salt, pepper, lemon juice and olive oil.

I love black-eyed peas. In Peru we call them panamitos and they’re very popular, as in most countries in South America, though they’re all cooked differently. I think the name their best name in Spanish is frijoles carita or “bean face.” Whatever you call them, they’re incredible, delicious and comforting, making the perfect side for any broiled meat. In this case, I’ve prepared pork chops my way not in the traditional Southern style. For this recipe, I’ve turned to classic ingredients found in African American Soul Food, as is the case with black-eyed peas. Kale is another popular ingredient in the Southern U.S., same as chard. Corn, another delicious ingredient typically found in this cuisine, could be added in order to complement this dish, depending on how hungry your family is. Remember that pork must always be well cooked to prevent any health issues, but you must be careful that it doesn’t dry out in the oven. You don’t want to serve a piece of cardboard for dinner instead of a juicy piece of meat, combined perfectly with these delicious beans. Do you have a favorite pork chop recipe?

Rate and Comment

Morena Cuadra Morena Cuadra
September 9, 2015

I love black-eyed peas. In Peru we call them panamitos and they’re very popular, as in most countries in South America, though they’re all cooked differently. I think the name their best name in Spanish is frijoles carita or “bean face.” Whatever you call them, they’re incredible, delicious and comforting, making the perfect side for any broiled meat. In this case, I’ve prepared pork chops my way not in the traditional Southern style. For this recipe, I’ve turned to classic ingredients found in African American Soul Food, as is the case with black-eyed peas. Kale is another popular ingredient in the Southern U.S., same as chard. Corn, another delicious ingredient typically found in this cuisine, could be added in order to complement this dish, depending on how hungry your family is. Remember that pork must always be well cooked to prevent any health issues, but you must be careful that it doesn’t dry out in the oven. You don’t want to serve a piece of cardboard for dinner instead of a juicy piece of meat, combined perfectly with these delicious beans. Do you have a favorite pork chop recipe?